Tips for Dealing With Frozen Pipes

December 14, 2017

Winter weather is upon us for much of North America and with that comes the usual cold weather hardships, including the possibility of snow, sleet and ice along with flu season and freezing temperatures. Those low temperatures can also usher in a specific plumbing complication for homeowners – frozen pipes.

A frozen pipe is a typical, yet sometimes large-scale plumbing issue to face. When the weather gets colder and the temperature falls below freezing, the water in your home’s pipes may freeze and enlarge, which lead to anything from a tiny leak to large-scale flooding.

There are several signs that can reveal a frozen pipe. If you notice a water line covered in frost or any lumps within the pipe, that is a pretty clear indication that your water pipe is frozen. While it may seem obvious to know if your water lines are frozen, just know that not all plumbing pipes are in sight. If you turn on the sink and the water is not running, or not flowing properly, or your toilets won’t refill after a flush, that’s also an indication that your pipes could be frozen.

So what can you do if you think your pipes could be frozen? It is crucial to turn off the power to your water supply before you try to thaw your pipe in order to prevent the pipe from breaking. Try warming the frozen area of the pipe with heated water or packing towels that have been soaked in hot water around your water pipes. If these measures don’t solve the problem, call a professional plumber in to help. Never attempt to use a blowtorch, kerosene or propane heater, or anything else with an open flame, as these are fire dangers.

If the pipe has actually burst, begin soaking up the water with a mop, rags or sponges to clean up as much as you can before it causes damage. If the damage is critical, go ahead and reach out to your insurance agent – some homeowners insurance policies cover burst pipes that cause water damage.

The American Red Cross recommends taking these steps to keep your pipes from freezing:

  • Keep garage doors sealed if there are water supply lines in the garage.

  • Open kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to permit warmer air to circulate around the plumbing. Be sure to move any toxic cleaners and household chemicals up out of the reach of children.

  • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe - even at a trickle - helps stop pipes from freezing.

  • Keep the thermostat set to the same temperature both during the day and at night. By temporarily suspending the use of lower nighttime temperatures, you may incur a higher heating bill, but you can prevent a much more costly repair job if pipes freeze and burst.

  • If you will be traveling during cold weather, leave the heat on in your home, set to a temperature no lower than 55° F.

If these preventative measures do not work and you find yourself dealing with frozen pipes this winter, call the plumbing Experts—available 24/7/365— to help at or schedule an appointment online.

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